As readers of the blog will know, the release of Parker's 2009 scores has had a dramatic impact on fine wine market pricing. In total, 19 wines were awarded 100 points – more than the perfect scores awarded to the 1982, 2000 and 2005 vintages combined. Whilst this reflects the profundity of the 2009 vintage as a whole, importantly, it also means that ten new chateaux have joined Parker's exclusive 100-point club.

In January 2012, the most affordable 100-point wine on the market was Pavie 2000 at £3,300 per case. Although 100-pointers can trade at vastly different price levels, the price disparity between them deepened last week when Smith Haut Lafitte received its first perfect score (and incidentally its first score over 95 points). At under £650 per case, the first timer was (briefly) a fifth of the price of Pavie.

By ranking less prestigious labels alongside, or even ahead of, the usual crowd, Parker moved the market overnight. Smith Haut Lafitte's value has more than doubled in the last few days, while Beausejour Duffau, which received a perfect score in 1990 but nothing above 93 thereafter, has risen 159 per cent. Pontet Canet and Leoville Poyferre are following a similar trajectory and are up between 36 per cent and 58 per cent respectively. 

Of course, some might wonder whether Bordeaux 2009's plethora of 100-point wines will decrease the value of perfect scores. This is doubtful as Parker has made it clear that 2009 is the greatest vintage of his lifetime. As such, its abundance of perfect wines is more likely to boost demand and add long-term value. 

The table below shows the 100-point club's newest member chateaux. 

Perfect wines
*Pape Clement Blanc and Bellevue Mondotte have not traded on Liv-ex this month.